Ride The Lightening by Metallica

Photo source: Metallica

 

One of Metallica‘s finest hours comes in the form of Ride the Lightning. The second studio album of Metallica‘s was recorded in Sweet Silence Studios, Copenhagen, Denmark, under producer Flemming Rasmussen. Shortly after producing this album, Metallica was hired by the label Elektra Records, who released the album in August of 1984.

Rumor has it that there’s a French green copy of the album that was mistakenly printed that are a rare collectors item. Another little tidbit of information is that this was the last album that Dave Mustane, former guitarist for Metallica who then went on to found Megadeth, was credited for co-writing a song.

The band members recorded on this album are James Hetfield, Lars Ulrich, Cliff Burton, and Kirk Hammett.

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Bicycles the Csepel Royal Way

Photo source: Csepel Royal | www.csepelroyal.hu

 

To create a bike that personifies the rider is a dream. Piece by piece, custom coloring, and… well.. EPIC! For every bike junkie out there, there is also a bike tweaker who cannot stop taking a allen key to their bike. This is their playground, this is their dream.

Introducing Csepel Royal, an opportunity to create a unique bike that matches your character. What do they offer? Well, if the photograph above doesn’t give you a hint, they offer all bike parts in single colors! Continue Reading →

Scattered Poems by Jack Kerouac

 

Jack Kerouac is one of the beatnik poets, one of the new American poets who sits along side the likes of Allen Ginsberg, Kenneth Rexroth, and Lawrence Ferlinghetti who called themselves the SF Renaissance [there are others: Corso, Snyder…].

Kerouac explores a different style of writing, one that flows from his mouth and plays with words. One that you can really read the rich accents and landscape with. Continue Reading →

We Sink by Sóley

Photo source: Sóley | www.soleysoley.com/

 

Every so often you run into an artist that simply makes you stop and think of looking up at the sky for some time wondering about things. Sóley unquestionably does this. I was first introduced to her at what is known as Bedroom Disco, a really ground roots movement where bands play by donation in a living room of some generous soul.

Sóley, a very charming individual, presents to the listener an array of songs filled with loops of dainty tidbits of delightfulness, and she does it all with this charisma that shows she is simply expressing her soul. Sóley is from Iceland, and she has a marvelous way about the world.

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Planet News by Allen Ginsberg

Planet News is a collection of Allen Ginsberg’s poems from 1961 – 1967.

If you are new to Allen Ginsberg, then it’s a brilliant thing you’ve found the poet. If you’re returning, then you should be aware of his theme for regurgitating, masturbation, and long forays into a realm that is like a side space between life and dream.  A dance with many words arranged in a random order at the authors wil and given to the reader to interpret it as they may, according to their mood and place in the book.

Planet News is a great book of poems. It encourages the reader to release their pre-conceived notions of poetry, and allow themselves to dance disturbingly through a picture that Ginsberg paints.

Journal Night Thoughts is one of the most chaotic verses of poetry conceived. Random rants and circles and un-announced paths discover that which cannot be explained.

Television was a Baby Crawling Toward that Deathchamber is a brilliant exploration of that exactly which the title describes, as much as any Ginsberg poem can stay upon one single topic.

Many of his poems explore city streets of places that Ginsberg is visiting, or places that Ginsberg has possibly been. Waking in New York, Vulture Peak: Gridhakuta Hill, Last Night in Calcutta, and Cafe in Warsaw at least mention the place in the title, and manage to brew up some sorts of raw cunning or unprotected adulterations that describe very true scenes that can be imagined.

I found the little poem First Party at Ken Kesey’s with Hell’s Angels a very interesting poem, as it seemed simpler and explored the spaces that Ginsberg likes to leave with less description and instead random observations, rather than his typical dreamscape that he explores with much more words.

Another topic of choice which, given the date the poems come from and Ginsberg’s cultural circle, seems only natural is the US Government. Ginsberg’s way of sarcastically exploiting that which he does not approve of was clear in many of the Wichita poems, such as Wichita Vortex Sutra, or in Today which is yet another complaint about the government.

Planet News is a beautiful read. If it’s not something you’re immediately interested in, the read is worth it for the mere significance Allen Ginsberg has had on the art of poetry.

500 Photographers

Every so often you come across a website that makes your jaw drop. Then, you see a link at the bottom that refers you to their reference. You go to that website, and find another link that refers you to their reference. In the world of internet, where everybody feels the need to write another article about something they’ve read online, this is just the way it goes.

My chain went like this: Visual New’s Outsiders: Beautiful Portraits of the Overlooked.

Where I saw this photograph (among many others) taken by Pierre Gonnord.

Photo Credit: Pierre Gonnord

Following links, I landed at a nearly identical article, clearly copied almost word for word by Visual News, at Sweet Sensation also on Pierre Gonnord.

Photo Credit: Pierre Gonnord

The links did not stop here, though the copying did.

From here, the viewer is directed towards a website called 500 Photographers.

On this website, obviously, is a display (still counting) of 500 photographers the author deems amazing. I have to say that I agree wholeheartedly.

The latest (#455) is Neil Krug with some photographs from his Pulp Art Book.

Photo Credit: Neil Krug

The next photographer, #454, is Manabu Yamanaka with some images from a mixture of his series’, this one taken from his Jyoudo series.

Photo Credit: Manabu Yamanaka

#453 is Deborah Luster, who has done a few series of very authentic American tragedies, this one taken from her One Big Self series on 3 American prisons surrounding New Orleans.

Photo Credit: Deborah Luster

#452 is a photographer from Brazil named Julio Bittencourt who has captured some very ‘behind the scenes’ insight into a world pushing the boundaries of squatter towns and drug dealers. This photograph is from his Citizen X series.

Photo Credit: Julio Bittencourt

In showing these photographs, I hope to illuminate the quality of work that each of the photographers do, and also the beautiful nature of the website 500 Photographers, and how well they’ve captured the essence of inspiring photography.

I nearly forgot the whole reason why I made it to that page in the first place was to find the source of the images of Pierre Gonnord!

How do you enjoy the images? Are they too raw?

Book Review: Sex With Kings by Eleanor Herman

Sex with Kings, the title, captures the essence of this… documentary. Chronicling five hundred years of kings who, as was the fashion, kept mistresses, or as the french called them, maîtresse-en-titre. Eleanor Herman does not about their military battles, nor about their rare stallions they kept. It does talk about their plumage, and touches on their ability to reproduce, but does not chronicle their lineage nor does it elaborate on their vaults of the finest jewels known to man. Continue Reading →

Book Review: At Work by Annie Leibovitz

Annie Leibovitz is one of the most well known magazine cover photographers around the world today. She has easily graced the covers of more than one of the magazines that you have ever held in your hands, and no doubt will continue to make an impression on the reading/viewing world of the future. Her body of work is expansive, and her style is iconic but raw. Continue Reading →