The Art of Marius Markowski

Artist Marius Markowski (b. 1976, Poland) (FB) creates pieces that exhibit such raw emotional sensitivity it catches one off guard (and ones breath). Marius exposes shapes and plays heavily with emotions. I really enjoy the busyness of the pieces, the chaotic simplicity. What is of particular interest to me, is the blending technique Marius uses, or rather, the exposed blending. How there are abrupt and clear lines for brush strokes.

Perhaps this is a result of Marius Markowski being a digital painter. Though he says of his work, “My artistic effort in digital painting founded its origin in the oil painting, where I was passionately focusing my energy for several years. One day I had the idea to prepare an image on the computer in order to have more liberty in the development process. I experimented with these new tools and so discovered my enthusiasm for digital painting.”

“In my artwork, I try to create vivid visual stimuli and have no intention to convey a political, moral or ideological message. I simply enjoy expressions of feelings, moods, ambiance and sensual perceptions.”

Marius Markowski | Source: facebook

Marius Markowski | Source: facebook

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Ides of March by Cy Twombly

Cy Twombly was born Edwin Parker Twombly, Jr. (b. April 25, 1928) in Lexington, Vigrinia.  He adopted the nickname of Cy from his father, who adopted his nickname after the notorious Cy Young (Twombly’s father was a pitcher for the Chicago White Sox).

Twombly began studying art at the age of 12, and spent the next dozen years in various fine art schools and receiving scholarships around the world. In 1951 Twombly had his first solo exhibition in New York at the Samuel M. Kootz gallery, which catapulted his international career and success as an artist. Shortly after this exhibition he, along with Robert Rauschenberg, received a grant from the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts to travel North Africa, Spain, Italy, and France, after which he began his short career as a teacher at the Southern Seminary and Junior College in Buena Vista, Virginia – 1954. In 1957 Twombly moved to Rome where he met his wife Baroness Tatiana Franchetti, sister to the art patron Baron Giorgio Franchetti, where he spent the better part of the rest of his life painting.

It was around 1955 – 59, that Twombly worked and shared art spaces in New York with a group of artists including Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, John Cage, being influenced by the teachers at the art school he was attending, Franz Kline, Ben Shahn, and Robert Motherwell. Here Twombly began to develop a technique of gestural drawing that appeared to be scratched into the surface. He was also heavily influenced by African tribal art, and practiced sculptures made of discarded objects to try and evoke this style.

Cy Twombly’s work often invoke romantic symbolism, using titles from classical myths and allegories as the work Ides of March has, along with other works like Birth of Venus, or Leda and the Swan to name a few. Further, Twombly used epic poetry and metaphors heavily in and as inspiration for his work. Around the mid-1950s, Twombly started to portray more graphic material in his pieces with erotic signs, intense and dense colours, ejaculations of paint, wounds and scoring.

“Over the surface of his Roman paintings would thus appear so many cocks and cunts, so many wounds and scorings, so many tatters played over the surface of the work, the erotics of which is that its body will never be reconstituted, whole.” ~Rosalind Krauss

While in the mode of creating, Twombly would cover an entire room with a canvas, and approach it however his desire fancied. After he had covered every wall with paint, he would cut out a section that looked as if it could be used, which he would nail to the wall.

Ides of March was completed in 1962 and is styled as an abstract expressionism figurative painting.

Source: cytwombly.info

Ides of March by Cy Twombly | Source: cytwombly.info

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On The Road by Jack Kerouac

Jack Kerouac is one of those American Legends, one of those legendary writers you say you wish you had read by now, and take note of the recommended books of his.

I got my hands on On the Road when I was staying on the road, spending the week at a cousins house. It seems I slip all my Kerouac books from houses I’m staying at, on the road. I’m fairly certain my cousin’s wife got the book in a college class as prescribed reading.

Source: beatbookcover.com

1st USA Viking Press Book Cover | Source: beatbookcover.com

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LULU by Lou Reed and Metallica

When LULU first came out all the Metallica junkies hated it. The mainstream music heroes said it was a huge flop. Social media made fun of it.

When LULU first came out, I watched a video interviewing the boys of Metallica and Lou and they were saying how it’s probably their greatest effort to date.

And still the critics yelled for it to be silenced.

I’m in the sixteenth minute of Lou Reed & Metallica performing the album live in Köln, and bloody hell it’s good.

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Book Review | Linchpin by Seth Godin

Seth Godin is what you might call a motivator. You may also call him an identifier. I’d say he is also a wise man, who’s done a lot of research on an alternative method of thought.

He talks about shifting away from being a cog in the wheel, a productive yet zombie-like member of the assembly line, in to the realm of artistry; in short, becoming a Linchpin.

Seth Godin - Linchpin

A very suiting title for this book, and to be perfectly honest, a great read. 5 stars, thumbs, whatever…

“What will make a Linchpin is not a shortcut. It’s the understanding of which hard work is worth doing. The only thing that separates great artists from the mediocre ones is their ability to push through the dip. Some people decide that their art is important that they out to overcome the resistance they face in doing their work. Those people become Linchpins.”

To understand this as Seth would like you to – aside from reading the book – the reader must be aware of two things. The first is that Godin describes how “art is the intentional act of using your humanity to create a change in another person.” Not just the artist with a paintbrush or camera, but the person with the willingness to put in the effort. The second is that this book is not about creating the next best thing, it’s about becoming indispensable; becoming a Linchpin.

To cheat Godin out of a book sale (in all likelihood it will make you want to read the entire book multiple times) he’s described what makes you indispensable:

  • provide a unique interface between members of the organization,
  • delivering unique creativity,
  • managing a situation or organization of great complexity,
  • leading customers,
  • inspiring staff,
  • providing deep domain knowledge,
  • possessing a unique talent.

Rest assured, if you think you know what all these points mean – and that you possess (some of) them – and/or you believe even just one of these qualities does indeed make the artist valuable, this book will be worth your read.

I would highly suggest taking notes of every single point Seth Godin makes that sticks out to you.

If you have read this book, I’d love to hear some points you’ve taken from this book that have changed your life.

 


Sigur Rós – Valtari

Below was taken directly from Sigur Rós’s website.

Written & directed by Christian Larson. Choreography by sidi larbi cherkaoui.
Cinematography by Mattias Montero, costume designer Lydia Kovacs, produced by Noreen Khan.

Directors Comments

I’ve always been inspired by dance, so I wanted to tell a short story with dialogue through movement, without anyone saying anything. Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui’s extraordinary choreography created this unique communication between the dancers James O’Hara & Nicola Leahey. Larbi’s way of working with flexibility played as an interesting contrast to the harsh environment in which Matthias Montero’s pure and ethereal style of cinematography allowed an intimate portrait of the couple.

Christian Larson

Christian Larson grew up drumming, dancing & filming skateboarding in Sweden and it was this background that helped carve his reputation of a rhythmic visual style. Starting out making music promos, he went on to be an editor for the renowned Swedish director Jonas åkerlund before focusing fully on directing. His work includes promos for Kylie Minogue, Tinie Tempah, Nero as well as commercials and editorials for wallpaper magazine, Absolut vodka and Roche Bobois.

Public Nudes of Ruslan Lobanov

You come across artists sometimes who you just can’t get enough of. Who you find you have to share with as many friends as you can… of course to those that will appreciate it.

Ruslan Lobanov (500px) from Kyiv, Ukraine is one of those artists.

Ruslan takes photos of women, nude, usually in public situations, in black and white. What I like most about the work is how passive the models seem to be of their nudity. Some of his photos speak more to me than others in this way.

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The Sick Child by Edvard Munch

The Sick Child , or Det Syke Barn in Norwegian, by Edvard Munch (1863-1944) is a painting with an interesting story. Munch created a number of lithographs, drypoints, etchings, and of course paintings with this same name from 1885 to 1926. The paintings represent Munchs sister, Johanne Sophie, the moment before she passed from tuberculosis at the age of 15.

The grieving woman is reportedly their aunt Karen, and typically in the various works Johanne Sophie is propped up by large pillows, a look of agony upon her face. It is also interesting to note the looming curtain drawn slightly on the right; perhaps the symbol of death itself, and the covered mirror behind the pillows.

Art critic Patricia Donahue had a very interesting observation: “It is almost as though the child, knowing that nothing more can be done, is comforting a person who has reached the end of her endurance” [Donahue, Patricia. “Nursing, the Finest Art: An Illustrated History”. St. Louis, MO: Mosby, 1996. 433.]

The paintings themselves have a very strong expression. The greens and yellows represent sickness, reds the dramatic (and coughed up blood from late stages of tuberculosis). You can notice strong vertical strokes from the brush, built up on layers of impasto paint [it is reported that these thick layers of paint are because of repeated reworking of the image, rather than a unique technique]. This style expresses emotive power, as if blurry eyed and hazy.

Munch has wrote that the 1885–86 painting was such a difficult struggle that its completion marked a major breakthrough in his art: “I started as an Impressionist, but during the violent mental and vital convulsions of the Bohême period Impressionism gave me insufficient expression—I had to find an expression for what stirred my mind … The first break with Impressionism was the Sick Child—I was looking for expression (Expressionism).” [Eggum, 46]

Interesting factual note that the Nazis felt Munch’s paintings were degenerate art and forcibly removed from all German museums.

This is the second of the six paintings completed by Munch, painted in 1896 when Munch was living in Paris.

The Sick Child by Edvard Munch in 1896

The Sick Child by Edvard Munch in 1896

More reading: Edvard Munch
The wikipedia page on The Sick Child is heavily referenced in this article.

New York City Will Support Fracking in a Major Way

It continually astounds me how, understanding the obtrusive nature of oil field fracking, it is still a viable option for getting gas/oil.. whatever.

Just the thought of this excites me and gets my blood boiling with deceit.. Why not invest the same amount of money into green infrastructure? It’s NY for pete sakes, it’s on the ocean. MAKE HYDRO POWER. We have the technology.

This is the video that will explain a bit more:

The more I learn, the more I understand how our government isn’t going to change a single thing. They are so heavily involved in Big Oil that they do not even have the slightest thought about anything else. It is up to us, the consumer, to go out and build ourselves this infrastructure. It starts with you [and me].

What ideas do you have to make this happen? I’ve got a tonne. I just sold my car.

I think the biggest thing that holds us back from this change is the fear that maybe it wont work. Educate yourselves.

I ask again, what ideas do you have to make this happen?

Marika Sviķe Takes Your Heart

Marika Sviķe

Marika Sviķe is a photographer based in Riga, Latvia. She’s a creative animal, working in fashion (check out her new fashion line Gatavs Valkāšanai which means ‘ready to wear’), design, digital manipulations, she models and well…

I recently re-fell in love with Marika’s work when I saw her Lina + Madara | March 2013 shoot. I think what attracts me most to this shoot is her flamboyant use of the painted on, semi transparent brush strokes. Also, she easily and effortlessly captures elegant sensuality, not only in her Lina + Madara work, but in all her work. I find in every photograph of hers there is a feeling of character, of personality, of purpose. There’s emotion, and style, and above all else there’s little bits of quirky!

Marika Sviķe | Lina + Madara | March 2013

Marika Sviķe | Lina + Madara | March 2013

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