The Photography of Sergio Buss

The Photography of Sergio Buss

Photographer Sergio Buss (fb, instagram, Become a Song) has an immediately arresting style. You can practically smell his photographs, feel the balmy humidity, or hear the fan clicking away in the background of the lazy day. In short, Sergio’s photography transports you to a place that’s hard to leave.

The Photography of Sergio Buss

One of my favorite qualities of his work is how he’s not afraid to let the grain show, a particularly unique soft spot I have developed from early Japanese street photography (see Daido Moriyama). What I also really appreciate is Sergio’s use of locations. He uses space as part of the photograph, not as something to be removed. With this in mind, he occasionally has walls cutting through half the image, or plants in the way. Love it! Continue Reading →

The Photography of Danielle Nicol

the photography of Danielle Nicol

Danielle Nicol’s (fb, Instagram) photography, when I first saw it, made me immediately recognize how real she is. Perhaps it’s because a lot of her work is self portraits, but there’s no denying that it’s human and exposed. She has a beautiful balance of catered perfection and half hazard causality. The very essence that makes cool I guess. I think this speaks a little bit for the fact that it’s mostly in black and white, which always eliminates any distractions and gets right to the point.

the photography of Danielle Nicol

photo courtesy of the artist // Danielle Nicol // model Rose Chantal

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The Art of Anders Zorn

I Sangkammaren by Anders Zorn

Swedish born Anders Zorn (February 18, 1860 – August 22, 1920) is an artist who will stop you in your tracks with awe. Such simplicity in his strokes while at the same time such volume and character.

This is art that will make you immediately think.

Righly so, Zorn is one of Sweden’s best known artists.

It’s messy and it’s diverse and it’s cunning and it’s deep. I think the most outstanding thing for me is the natural feeling the surroundings have in the paintings. It feels as though the subjects are at home.

It is clear to see the pride Zorn had in his homeland, and reading about his life, it’s also very evident. In 1896 the Zorn’s decided to move back to Sweden from Paris. They bought land and old cottages in Sweden, and together with his wife established a reading society, parish library, a childrens’ home, the Mora domestic handicraft organization, and a folk music revival that still lasts till this day as one of the most prestigious Folk Music Awards in Sweden.

Zorn had a lot of international acclaim in his life, both for painting and etching, and received many quite amazing opportunities to do portraits of quite prominent members of society. At the Paris World Fair in 1889, the 29-year-old Zorn was awarded the French Legion of Honour. In 1893, the Columbian World Fair was arranged in Chicago of which Zorn was chosen as the superintendent of the Swedish art exhibition. Again, this resulted in many commissions, notably of Presidents: portrait of Grover Cleveland and his wife (1899, National Portrait Gallery, Washington DC), an etching for Theodore Roosevelt in 1905, and a painting of William Taft (1911, the White House). Swedish noteables included many members of the Royal Family, including Queen Sofia (1909, Waldemarsudde, Stockholm).

Froknarna Salomon (The misses Salomon) by Anders Zorn

Froknarna Salomon (The misses Salomon) by Anders Zorn

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The Art of Craww

Harbour by Craww

Every once and a while I stumble upon an artist that exudes the kind of mystery and illusion that I’m so very fond of. Shapes and sizes do not matter, it’s emotion and brilliance that I look for. Something out of the ordinary that’s taken beyond what I could ever imagine, redefining what those boundaries are.

Craww is one of those artists that’s done this for me.  His sentiment I am so fond of right now, a mixture of black heartedness, macabre, and longing.

From his site: “His work is a stream of consciousness ramble through the woods, uncovering secret stories and ambiguous connections, it’s direction influenced as much by accident and a short attention span as design. It is a world populated with skulls, crows and melancholic girls embraced by flowing lines and natural forms.”

I am particularly fond of his use of chairiscuro, integrating animals and decaying plants in a foggy haze of sweet oblivion.

Woven by Craww

Woven by Craww

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In This Twilight by Josephine Cardin

Josephine Cardin - In This Twilight

When I see art that I like, I seem to have a moment of frantic disbelief, scrambling to capture and enjoy and seek more and more of what I’ve just uncovered.

Thankfully we have the internet.

Josephine Cardin (FB, Behance) is an artist that does that for me. In her bio she states: “But at the end of the day, I live to create and create… well, because it is fulfilling, and fun.”

It is clear to understand that Cardin has a background in dance, but she’s also an art historian, a visual artist, and a photographer. One thing that I appreciate of artists is when they pull from multiple disciplines to influence their current works, Cardin seems to have a magical aura about her work that is dripping in historical significance.

I have chosen In This Twilight to showcase Josephine Cardin’s work because it is an astounding exploration of body, movement, fine art, light, and feature. Immediately I am left wondering how she has managed to create such detail in muscle structure yet her lighting seems to be so soft and delicate that even the background fades into darkness. There is mood in the motion, there is a distance one can feel. And the background! It makes me feel like a smoky dream wafting around the room, lost in a memory, which melds perfectly with the fabric that is being used throughout the project.

Josephine Cardin - In This Twilight Continue Reading →

Dead Mother by Egon Schiele

Egon Schiele (June 12, 1890 – October 31, 1918) painted Dead Mother in 1910 in Czech Republic.

Let me step back a few moments.

Schiele – as many artists tend to do – lived an alternate type of lifestyle as he explored. For example, when he was younger and his fascination in trains grew, his father (who was the train master in Tullen) was so disturbed by his representation of them that he had to burn his sketch books.

At 16 he was accepted into Kunstgewerbeschule (School of Arts and Crafts) in Vienna (1906), to which he was encouraged by the instructors a year after to go to the more formal and traditional academy, Akademie der Bildenden Künste. It is without a doubt that the conservative styles of both academies frustrated Schiele, which ultimately led him to leave 3 years later. Schiele founded the group Neukunstgruppe (“New Art Group”) with other dissatisfied students shortly after leaving Akademie der Bildenden Künste.

Around this time, Schiele found Gustav Klimt (an alumni of Kunstgewerbeschule), who happily took interest in Schiele, encouraging him by purchasing his work, trading his work for Schiele’s, and also arranging exhibits and models for the younger artist. It was at this time that Schiele met Walburga (Wally) Neuzil, a young lady who would be the model for many of his future works and partner for some time. Around 1911 they were chased out of Český Krumlov (Krumau) in southern Bohemia (Czech Republic) – the birthplace of Schiele’s mother – because the residents strongly disapproved of their lifestyle, not to mention their employment of the town’s teenage girls as models (allegedly).

In 1912 Schiele was arrested for seducing a young girl below the age of consent. Hundreds of his drawings were seized because they were considered pornographic, but the charges of seduction and abduction were dropped. However, during the trial, the judge burned one of the offending drawings over a candle flame.

It is tragic to learn that the Spanish flu pandemic (which took 20,000,000 lives in Europe) took Schiele’s pregnant wife of 4 years (not Wally), and Schiele himself 3 days afterwards at the age of 28.

Dead Mother

It is interesting to note that Dead Mother is part of the Expressionist movement, a symbolic painting that clearly has influence by psychoanalysis. Austrian neurologist and founding father of psychoanalysis, Freud (May 6, 1856 – September 23, 1939), was becoming very eminent in theology, and as a result, all society. This reasoning process, and identification led to some very astounding revelations in many genres of expression, particularly in art.

It is almost too easy to identify certain aspects of Schiele’s life with this painting. His eldest sister died at the age of 10, when Shiele was just 3 years old. His father died in 1904, when he was 14, and his mother had lost a child at birth and also had a stillborn. To further complicate things, his mother married his fathers brother-in-law (this fact seems odd).

Morbid is the word, dark and tortured.

Photo source:

Photo source:


The Art of Marius Markowski

Artist Marius Markowski (b. 1976, Poland) (FB) creates pieces that exhibit such raw emotional sensitivity it catches one off guard (and ones breath). Marius exposes shapes and plays heavily with emotions. I really enjoy the busyness of the pieces, the chaotic simplicity. What is of particular interest to me, is the blending technique Marius uses, or rather, the exposed blending. How there are abrupt and clear lines for brush strokes.

Perhaps this is a result of Marius Markowski being a digital painter. Though he says of his work, “My artistic effort in digital painting founded its origin in the oil painting, where I was passionately focusing my energy for several years. One day I had the idea to prepare an image on the computer in order to have more liberty in the development process. I experimented with these new tools and so discovered my enthusiasm for digital painting.”

“In my artwork, I try to create vivid visual stimuli and have no intention to convey a political, moral or ideological message. I simply enjoy expressions of feelings, moods, ambiance and sensual perceptions.”

Marius Markowski | Source: facebook

Marius Markowski | Source: facebook

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Ides of March by Cy Twombly

Cy Twombly was born Edwin Parker Twombly, Jr. (b. April 25, 1928) in Lexington, Vigrinia.  He adopted the nickname of Cy from his father, who adopted his nickname after the notorious Cy Young (Twombly’s father was a pitcher for the Chicago White Sox).

Twombly began studying art at the age of 12, and spent the next dozen years in various fine art schools and receiving scholarships around the world. In 1951 Twombly had his first solo exhibition in New York at the Samuel M. Kootz gallery, which catapulted his international career and success as an artist. Shortly after this exhibition he, along with Robert Rauschenberg, received a grant from the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts to travel North Africa, Spain, Italy, and France, after which he began his short career as a teacher at the Southern Seminary and Junior College in Buena Vista, Virginia – 1954. In 1957 Twombly moved to Rome where he met his wife Baroness Tatiana Franchetti, sister to the art patron Baron Giorgio Franchetti, where he spent the better part of the rest of his life painting.

It was around 1955 – 59, that Twombly worked and shared art spaces in New York with a group of artists including Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, John Cage, being influenced by the teachers at the art school he was attending, Franz Kline, Ben Shahn, and Robert Motherwell. Here Twombly began to develop a technique of gestural drawing that appeared to be scratched into the surface. He was also heavily influenced by African tribal art, and practiced sculptures made of discarded objects to try and evoke this style.

Cy Twombly’s work often invoke romantic symbolism, using titles from classical myths and allegories as the work Ides of March has, along with other works like Birth of Venus, or Leda and the Swan to name a few. Further, Twombly used epic poetry and metaphors heavily in and as inspiration for his work. Around the mid-1950s, Twombly started to portray more graphic material in his pieces with erotic signs, intense and dense colours, ejaculations of paint, wounds and scoring.

“Over the surface of his Roman paintings would thus appear so many cocks and cunts, so many wounds and scorings, so many tatters played over the surface of the work, the erotics of which is that its body will never be reconstituted, whole.” ~Rosalind Krauss

While in the mode of creating, Twombly would cover an entire room with a canvas, and approach it however his desire fancied. After he had covered every wall with paint, he would cut out a section that looked as if it could be used, which he would nail to the wall.

Ides of March was completed in 1962 and is styled as an abstract expressionism figurative painting.


Ides of March by Cy Twombly | Source:



LULU by Lou Reed and Metallica

When LULU first came out all the Metallica junkies hated it. The mainstream music heroes said it was a huge flop. Social media made fun of it.

When LULU first came out, I watched a video interviewing the boys of Metallica and Lou and they were saying how it’s probably their greatest effort to date.

And still the critics yelled for it to be silenced.

I’m in the sixteenth minute of Lou Reed & Metallica performing the album live in Köln, and bloody hell it’s good.

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Sigur Rós – Valtari

Below was taken directly from Sigur Rós’s website.

Written & directed by Christian Larson. Choreography by sidi larbi cherkaoui.
Cinematography by Mattias Montero, costume designer Lydia Kovacs, produced by Noreen Khan.

Directors Comments

I’ve always been inspired by dance, so I wanted to tell a short story with dialogue through movement, without anyone saying anything. Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui’s extraordinary choreography created this unique communication between the dancers James O’Hara & Nicola Leahey. Larbi’s way of working with flexibility played as an interesting contrast to the harsh environment in which Matthias Montero’s pure and ethereal style of cinematography allowed an intimate portrait of the couple.

Christian Larson

Christian Larson grew up drumming, dancing & filming skateboarding in Sweden and it was this background that helped carve his reputation of a rhythmic visual style. Starting out making music promos, he went on to be an editor for the renowned Swedish director Jonas åkerlund before focusing fully on directing. His work includes promos for Kylie Minogue, Tinie Tempah, Nero as well as commercials and editorials for wallpaper magazine, Absolut vodka and Roche Bobois.